You never know what you will find when you go out our front door!

fall of 2011

For the last couple of days we have had our sheep,goats, donkey and chickens in the front yard. To get to the mailbox , walk the dogs or get to my car I needed to step over the electro net portable fencing. Now as you would expect from the description that the fence is electrified…..Unfortunately for a couple of days a small portion of the fence was not electrified. But we fixed the glitch and now it gives quite a good shock ,as the dogs ,my husband and I will attest too!

But more frightening is going out the front door (we don’t have a back door at the moment) with fruit or veggies on trays that are destined for the freezer and then getting mobbed by every animal on the farm who believes that what you are carrying  is for them! Our sheep are not shy……they see me and assume I have food for them, especially during canning season,so my problem is understandable,but this situation is only temporary.

Monday morning we moved the mob to the back yard in between the house and the greenhouse . We will rotate their pasture every 2 to3 days as they mow the lawn, the edge of the road and eat the taller weeds,poison ivy,creeper and golden rod! I haven’t mowed the lawn in a couple of years, but yes we do have to weed whack the plants that the mob doesn’t like to eat, but that is much easier than mowing the lawn!

Thank you for coming to the Articulture Farmers Market on Saturday!

Holstein's Youngest boy Named "Sponge Bob" ,he was a preemie.

It was great to see so many people come out to this unique farmers market and art exhibit! I really enjoyed

Mr Young rooster with one of his "ladies"

seeing how each of the artists interpreted our farm in both paint and photographs! Thank you Betsy Janeway for making our Goats look much less devious than they are. I also want to thank Ryan Ferdinand for making my 12 year old  hair sheep Butch and our young rooster look so  good in her photographs. It was a long day, but  well worth it to talk to other vendors and all the people from Webster and the surrounding towns who came to join us, Thank you Mason  for inviting us!

The chicks have arrived! There will be Chicken this summer!

The Chicks are here!Well we have 100+ little bundles of fuzz in our chicken house!They are a wild bunch, can’t wait till they are big enough to go out into the new Outdoor chicken house. We will surround  the new chicken house with poultry netting, allowing the chicks to be out on the  grass and then into the chicken house at night to keep them from predators !Stand by for more chicken information!

The new Chicken house!

 

Sparkle loves the long grass!

Right now the donkey, goats and sheep are working hard grazing the long grass next to the new chicken house and we are moving them every 4-5 days using electro net to contain them so they eat everything before moving them on to the next patch.

Of course they got one of the old asparagus plants…

 

Thistles

Rhymes with ‘pistols’.Horse Thistle Plant

Unless you are a donkey, in which case it rhymes with ‘breakfast’.

Some folks think they are a nuisance.  The goats and donkey eat them up.  The sheep not so much.

Some of them get really big, especially when they are outside the fence-line (there loose lips cannot reach).

In springtime all the interesting plants come out to play.  Tender and tasty.  The Poison Ivy is gone from our fields – all eaten by the goats.  Wild Brambles?  Gone too.   And a strong fence around the cultivated ones.

If you have scrub to clear, there is nothing than goats, donkeys and some time.

Gotta go move the fence out…

Some of the Boys

The Bigger White Rooster

We have too many roosters.  This poor guy(you’d never know it to look at him now) ran into a buzz saw called Mr. Big a few weeks ago.  Usually the foxes and raccoons limit the population but this year all 6 roosters survived.  We are currently researching Coq Au Vin solutions.

We tried placing him for adoption but all the interested party wanted to know what was wrong with him.  He’s a rooster.  What else do you need to know?